YEWMANYETI

YEWMANYETI

Yuma Bellomee (pronounced like Bellamy), who goes by the name Yewmanyeti was born August 23, 1981 in Bronx, NY. He spent most of his childhood living in the south side of Mt. Vernon, NY, where he currently resides, and between schools in Mt. Vernon and the Bronx. At an early age, he was exposed to West African culture through his mother, Brenda, who studied African dance, and his father, Zeleka, a musician who played an instrumental role in the Afro-Caribbean style band called Spirit Ensemble and specialized in playing the mbira (m-BEER-ah), cora (KOR-ah), dozengoni (‘doze-n-GO-nee), and various percussion instruments. Yuma displayed his interest in many genres of music and culture at an early age and began studying the West African drum, djembe (pronounced JEM-bay) at the age of 2 years old under master drummer, Kyende Ohuru (kie-END-day oh-HOO-rue).

Unable to continue his lessons there due to time, money, and distance circumstances, he continued drumming for the cultural community of Mt. Vernon and learning more along the way. Also during his childhood, Yuma briefly took piano lessons, which he came out of with the ability to play using his right hand. He would tinker around with the piano and drums for a while, eventually learning the alto and tenor saxophone which he played from middle school through high school in band. At the age of 15, during his stay in Jacksonville, Florida is where he was persuaded by his brother, Rahjae, and who he refers to as his cousins, Joseph and John Scott, to embark on writing rap verses. Influenced by the creativity of Hip Hop artists such as Busta Rhymes, Wu-Tang Clan, Big Pun, and others, he concentrated on first honing his rhyming, then his lyrical skill.

He wrote his first poem for an English assignment in his senior year of high school, and continued writing Hip Hop music and composing a few melodies for it. In the year 2000, he created the Yewmanyeti moniker that he’s gone by ever since. After finding a few message boards online, including Vocalized Ink, he was encouraged to write more poetry and eventually record his written poetry pieces for the first time. Influenced by his Hip Hop style, he continues to write poetry occasionally as a hobby and form of release. He is also currently working on a Hip Hop CD entitled Fulphilological Progressions, which he is hoping to complete by the spring of 2007.

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